fc2ブログ

#79 Etiquette Trivia - 礼作法の雑学

79-Etiquette.jpg

We shake hands with others as a sign of friendship. Originally, the act of showing an open hand means that you have nothing hidden in your hand. Most people are right-handed, so the right hand is considered the attacking hand. By letting others grab your right hand, you show that you have no hostility.

Likewise, there is a way to show that you are not hostile, even if you are holding a sword. If you hold the sword in your left hand, people will not trust you because you can pull out the sword with your right hand. So, when you hold the Saya (scabbard) from above with your right hand, with the Saya-jiri (tip) in front and the Tuka (handle) behind you, you show that you do not intend to pull out the sword.

By the way, in Shinto (Japanese religion), there is an idea that the left side is the higher side and the right side is the lower side. For this reason, it is said that even left-handed Samurai hold their precious swords on the left side.

In the old days, Dojos were designed and built according to the orientation of the land. But nowadays, most Dojos are rented, so the general rule is that “the right side of the Dojo is the upper seat and the left side is the lower seat when facing the front”. This is because the Dojo master sits with his back to the front, so his left hand side is the upper seat.

In the etiquette, there are various differences between Aikido's etiquette and Kendo / Iaido's etiquette. The most obvious difference is the highest form of respect.

Japanese Dojos have a household Shinto altar at the front. In Aikido, bowing to the altar is the highest courtesy. However, in Iaido, bowing to the sword is the highest courtesy.

Also, in Aikido, the way you stand up from the Seiza position is different from Iaido. In Iaido, since the sword is held in the left hand, you step out from the right foot. However, in Aikido, some people step out from the foot on the lower seat side according to Shinto etiquette.

In NZ, there is no Shinto altar in the dojo, so instead of the altar, bow to the front. So, like any other martial arts, I think it's best to think of it as "sitting with your left foot first, and standing with your right foot first".

To define the front of the dojo without the altar, you must display a picture of O-Sensei, the national flag, or the dojo motto.

Highest courtesy (bow to the altar, bow to the front):

> Do it in Seiza position
> Place your hands on the floor in the order of left and right hands
> Put your hands to elbows on the floor, tilt your upper body deeply
> When you raise your head, place your right and left hands on your knees in that order

Ordinary courtesy (courtesy to others):

> In Seiza postition, place your hands shoulder-width apart on the floor and tilt your upper body at 45 degrees
> In standing position, place your hands in front of your thighs and tilt your upper body at 45 degrees

Now, the kenjutsu of Aikido is called Aiki-ken. It was handed down from O-Sensei to Saito Shihan, and it is also called Iwama-ryu Kenjutsu. However, since the Iwama Ryu Dojo became independent from the Aikikai in 2004, opportunities to learn the Aiki-ken are very limited.

So, I did a little research on the Iwama-ryu etiquette for "bowing to the front", so I would like to share the information with you.

Here's what to do when bowing to the front with your Bokken.

For sitting bowing:

> Hold the Bokken in your right hand with the blade facing up.
> From an upright position to Kiza (kneeling) and Seiza (sitting).
> Place the Bokken sideways in front of you.
> The Tuka (handle) is on the left side and the blade is on your side.
> Sit up straight and make the highest courtesy (bow to the front).
> Hold the Bokken in your right hand and place it at your right side, you stand up straight from Kiza (kneeling) with the Bokken.
> Afterwards, when bowing to the others, change the hand holding the Bokken to your left hand.

For standing bowing:

> Hold the Bokken in your right hand with the blade facing up and stand upright.
> Hold it from underneath with both hands, with the Tuka (handle) on the left side and the blade on your side.
> Raise the Bokken above eye level.
> Bow to the front.
> Turn the Tuka (handle) up and grab it again with your right hand.
> Lower your right hand to the right side and stand upright.
> Afterwards, when bowing to the others, change the hand holding the Bokken to your left hand.

In NZ, after bowing to the front, you usually move the Bokken to the left, which I think is an influence of Australia. The sword is moved back to the left side in Iaido, too. In any case, etiquette is a matter of mind, so it is not a matter of which one is correct.

In Ueshiba Sensei's Aikido, we bow to each other not as enemies, but as a sign of friendship. I've heard that O-Sensei changed the depth of his religious beliefs and martial arts philosophy as he got older, but it would be rather natural for anyone to do so. No one can deny that he has changed.

Swords are essentially a weapon for killing people, but we who live in the modern world are not practicing it in preparation for killing each other. Martial arts also change with the times. I would like to continue to enjoy Aikido as a martial art of harmony.

Thanks for reading.

Related article: Mutual respect


[ 礼作法の雑学 - 正面に礼 ]

私達は、友好の証として他者と握手をします。本来、手を広げて見せる行動には、手に何も隠し持っていないという意味があります。大半の人は右利きなので右手は攻撃の手であり、その右手を他者に差し出すことで敵意がないことを示します。

同様に、帯刀している者が敵意がないことを示す所作があります。左手で刀を持っているとすぐに右手で抜刀できるので、警戒されて信頼を得られません。なので、鞘尻(剣先)を前、柄頭を後ろにして右手で上から鞘を持つ所作は、抜刀する意思がないことを示します。

ちなみに、左利きの人も左側に帯刀するのは、神道では左側が上位、右側が下位という考えがあるからといわれています。命より大切な刀を下にすることはできないということではないでしょうか。

昔は方位に従って道場が建てられ上座を決めていましたが、現代ではほとんどの道場が賃貸なので「正面に向かって右側を上座、左側を下座」とするのが一般的です。これは、正面を背にして座る最高位師範の左手側を上位とするためです。視点が違うので少し混同するかもしれません。

礼法において、合気道の所作と剣道・居合道の所作とでは色々と違いがあります。特に違いがはっきりしているのは最敬礼です。

日本の道場には神棚(神前)があります。体術や武器取りを稽古する合気道では、神前礼が最敬礼となります。一方、刀法や剣術の立会いを学ぶ居合いでは、刀礼が最敬礼となります。

神前を最敬礼とする合気道では、正座からの立ち上がり方にも居合道との違いがあります。剣道・居合道では帯刀していることが前提なので常に右足から踏み出しますが、合気道では神道所作に従って下座側から踏み出す先生もいます。座礼での手の置き方も左から床におきますよね。

NZにおいては、道場に神棚はないので「神前に」ではなく「正面に礼」をします。なので、他武道と同様に「座るときは左足から、立つときは右足から」で良いと思います。

神棚がない道場で正面を定めるには、大先生の写真、国旗、または、道場訓を掲げます。

最敬礼(神前に礼、正面に礼):
>座礼で行なう
>手から肘までを床につけて深く上半身を倒す
>手をつくときは左手右手の順番、頭を上げるときは右手左手の順番で上げる

普通礼(人への礼):
>座礼では、手を肩幅で床につき上半身を45度傾ける
>立礼では、手を腿の前において上半身を45度傾ける

さて、合気道の剣術は合気剣と呼ばれています。大先生から斉藤師範へと伝承され、岩間流剣術ともいわれています。剣術の伝承については色々と意見があるようですが、話しがそれるので省きます。ただ、岩間流道場は、2004年に合気会から独立しているので合気剣を習う機会はとても限られています。

そこで、岩間流剣術の「正面に礼」をする場合の所作を少し調べてみましたので、皆さんと情報を共有したいと思います。

座礼の場合:
・木剣の刃を上にして右手に持つ
・直立の姿勢から,跪座、正座へ移行する
・木剣を横にして自分の前に置く
・そのとき、柄が左側,刃が手前(自分側)になるように置く
・正座で最敬礼をする
・手前に置いた木剣を右手で右横に戻し,剣をもって跪座からまっすぐ立ち上がる
・その後、相手に礼をするときは左手に持ち変える

立礼の場合:
・木剣の刃を上にして右手に持ち、直立姿勢をする
・柄が左側,刃が自分側になるように横にして、両手で下から持つ
・横にした木剣を目線より上にあげる
・正面に礼をする
・柄を上にして右手でつかみ直す
・右手で右脇に下ろし,直立姿勢で待つ
・その後、相手に礼をするときは左手に持ち変える

礼をした後で、そのまま左横に帯刀するスタイルがNZでは一般的ですが、これはオーストラリアの影響ではないかと思います。居合道の刀礼も左横へと刀を戻します。いずれにしても、作法は心構えの問題なのでどれが正しいということではないのでしょう。

稽古で人と対面するときは、敵としてではなく友好の証として礼をするのが植芝先生の合気道です。年齢と共に大先生の信仰心や技への理念が変わっていったと聞きますが、むしろそれは誰にでもある自然な変化だと思います。

剣は本来、人を殺すための武器ですが、現代に生きる私達は殺し合いに備えて稽古しているわけではありません。武道も時代とともに変わります。和の武道として、今後も合気道を楽しんでいきたいと思います。


関連記事:礼には礼で応える

79-Etiquette_Katana.jpg
スポンサーサイト



テーマ : 合気道
ジャンル : スポーツ

プロフィール

大福

Author:大福
初心者にも分かりやすく、理論的に基礎知識を説明します。なんとなく他人の動きを真似るのではなく、普段から考える力を育てていくことを目的としています。In this blog, I explain the basics in a theoretical way that is easy to understand for beginners. The aim is to help you to develop your ability to think, not to copy the movements somehow. Aikido is not magic. I will explain things that are not so clear, such as Ki and O-Sensei's philosophy.

最新記事
最新コメント
月別アーカイブ
カテゴリ
検索フォーム
RSSリンクの表示
リンク
ブロとも申請フォーム

この人とブロともになる

QRコード
QR